Situations can change within years, or even months, after your divorce. When this happens, you may realize that your initial divorce agreement no longer reflects your current situation, and you may need post-divorce modifications. Continue reading to learn your eligibility in modifying the terms of your alimony, child support, or child custody agreements and how an experienced Morristown post-judgment modification lawyer at Graves Andrews, LLC can guide you through the process.

Can I make modifications to my alimony agreement post-divorce?

Alimony agreements are commonly requested to be modified post-divorce. Such modifications are necessary if you experience a significant, negative change in your financial situation that was unforeseen, such as losing your job or needing to pay off hefty medical bills. The same goes for your former spouse if they have a significant, positive change in their financial situation. Specifically, if you are the supporting spouse, and your former spouse remarries, is living with a new romantic partner, or otherwise has a new financial means to support themselves, then you can request the modification or termination of your alimony agreement.

Can I make modifications to my child support and child custody agreements post-divorce?

Child support and child custody agreements are also commonly prone to post-divorce modifications. For child support, the following are grounds for a modification or termination of your agreement:

  • Your child reaches the age of amancipation.
  • Your child gets married.
  • Your child joins the military.
  • It can be proven that your child is now financially independent.

It is important to note that if you are the supporting spouse, your former spouse may counter this request. Specifically, they can request to extend the child support beyond the age of emancipation if your child is planning on attending higher education, has special needs, or otherwise have valid grounds that they need the extension.

As for child custody modifications, if you would like to obtain sole custody, you will have to provide evidence that your former spouse has recently proved to be a posed danger or unfit parent to your child. On the flip side, if you would like to reinstate joint custody, you will have to provide evidence that your former spouse has recently made improvements to their character and that their presence will be in the best interest of your child.

If you believe that your post-divorce situation is applicable for a modification or termination of your alimony, child support, or child custody agreements, do not hesitate in reaching out to a skilled Morristown family law attorney today.

Contact Our Experienced New Jersey Firm

Contact Graves Andrews, LLC to schedule an initial consultation with our experienced Morris County family law attorneys to learn more about our services and how we can assist you.