person in handcuffs

New Jersey statute recognizes indictable offenses, which are criminal offenses equivalent to what are considered felonies in other states. Such indictable offenses are broken up into different degrees, thereby having different levels of criminal punishments. Regardless, these criminal punishments are harsher than those that come with disorderly persons offenses, which are the equivalent of misdemeanors.¬†Continue reading to learn the penalties for indictable offenses and how an experienced Morristown criminal defense lawyer at Graves Andrews, LLC can help you achieve a “not guilty” verdict.

What are the penalties for indictable offenses in the state of New Jersey?

In the state of New Jersey, indictable offenses may be categorized as fourth-degree, third-degree, second-degree, or first-degree offenses. Without further ado, the possible penalties associated with each degree of offense read as follows:

  • An indictable offense of the fourth degree (i.e., forgery):
    • A prison sentence of up to 18 months.
    • A fine of up to $10,000.
  • An indictable offense of the third degree (i.e., motor vehicle theft):
    • A prison sentence of anywhere between three to five years.
    • A fine of up to $15,000.
  • An indictable offense of the second degree (i.e., armed burglary):
    • A prison sentence of anywhere between five to 10 years.
    • A fine of up to $150,000.
  • An indictable offense of the first degree (i.e., aggravated manslaughter):
    • A prison sentence of anywhere between 10 to 20 years.
    • A fine of up to $200,000.

That said, the New Jersey criminal judge may reference this guideline when determining your sentence. The judge is prohibited from going above the maximum sentences enforced by state law. However, they may upgrade the degree of your indictable offense if there were aggravating circumstances surrounding your case. Therefore, this may subsequently increase the severity of your penalties.

In addition, the judge may reference this guideline when deciding whether to grant probation. For example, the presumption for indictable offenses of the second and first degree is that the convicted individual will go directly to prison. But first-time offenders of indictable offenses of the fourth and third degree may be allowed to serve all or most of their sentence with probation.

What is the statute of limitations for being sentenced to these criminal penalties?

Similar to New Jersey civil cases, criminal cases have a statute of limitations in which a defendant may be punished for their wrongdoings. So for indictable offenses, an accusation must be made generally within five to seven years from the date on which the supposed crime occurred. However, this deadline does not apply to certain crimes, such as murder and manslaughter.

With all things considered, you may be intimidated by the criminal court proceedings ahead of you. One way to make this easier is to have a skilled Morristown criminal defense lawyer stand by you. Contact Graves Andrews, LLC at your earliest possible convenience.